Tag Archives: guitar

Juracán shows flashes of post rock on acoustic guitar-filled sophomore album, Jarineo

Photo Courtesy of Anima Recordings

An album that has a lot of guitar playing on it still might not fit the label of a “guitar album.”

But, Juracán’s latest LP, Jarineo, which spans 20 tracks of fingerpicked melodies and reverberated echoes, could most definitely be categorized as such.

Juracán is the musical project of Portland-based musician Pierre Carbuccia Abbott. Originally from the Domican Republic, the multi-instrumentalist blends Latin-tinged acoustic guitar playing with reverbed-out post rock leads to craft a sophomore album that gives off a relaxing, end-of-the-day feel. Janireo carries along like mellow evening, a laid back mood interrupted only by the staccato power chords of the sludgy outlier, “Tensión” (Juracán’s sole member also plays bass in the Portland metal band, Flood Peak).

Carrabuccia Abbott’s lyrics pair well with the reflective feel of Janireo’s songs. Although most of the songs have Spanish titles, he sings all of his lyrics in English, save for his vocals on the piano-lead song, “Valor.” On album highlight “Psychotherapy,” he introduces his confessional-style vocals with lines such as “I haven’t felt this lost/Since my teenage years” or “I wanna tell you more/But I don’t know what to say.” The abundance of beatdown lyrics — which can also be found on other songs such as “Anxiety Riddles” or the Elliott Smith-indebted track called “More Space” — bolster the ruminative and plentiful instrumentals on the record.

In fact, the majority of songs on Janireo are free of vocals. An early instrumental track titled “En Casa” sounds like one of Led Zeppelin’s folk ballads with its intricate guitarwork and brooding sonic backdrop. “Complacencia,” the album’s longest track at four and a half minutes, dives headfirst into an ambient style by employing rumbling effects and soothing electric guitar melodies. Elsewhere on Jarineo, short interludes fill out the album by adding new textures and soundscapes to explore.

In addition to his favored instrument, the guitar, Carbuccia Abbott also introduces several other instruments on Jarineo such as a deep-sounding clarinet on the song “Clarinete” and a South American-sounding flute on “Flautéamo,” with the latter track featuring dynamic bass lines, as well.

The saxophone playing of collaborator Eric Leavell on “Flying Again” is another welcome addition to the album’s musical diversity. The single is also notable for having that album’s most uplifting chorus. “Sometimes it feels like you can fly/And sometimes you give flying a try,” Carbuccia Abbott sings atop his loudly strummed acoustic guitar.

Looking past the sometimes unpolished production on Janireo, Carbuccia Abbott’s practiced guitar animates every track on Juracán’s sophomore release, even when songs don’t fit conventional rock or pop structures. Jarineo is a textbook “guitar album” that notably incorporates a number of other instruments in support of its skillfully layered six-string sketches.

3.5/5

Stuart’s Opera House to host solo guitarists from noise, psych-rock and American Primitivist backgrounds

http://www.thepostathens.com/article/2017/01/lee-ranaldo-and-steven-gunn-athens-ohio

Guitarists Lee Ranaldo, Steve Gunn and Meg Baird will wield a different kind of ax in the heart of Wayne National Forest, one that does not cut down but rather builds up.

Stuart’s Opera House will host the three guitarists Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. Psych-folk guitarist Meg Baird will play an opening set at the venue at 52 Public Square, Nelsonville followed by the co-headlining sets of Sonic Youth founding member Lee Ranaldo and New York guitarist Steve Gunn.

Tickets to the show are available online for $17 for main floor and $20 for box seats. Tickets sold at the door cost $22 for the main floor and $25 for box seats.

Lee Ranaldo received acclaim over his three-decade career as a founding member of the groundbreaking noise-rock group Sonic Youth along with Thurston Moore and Kim Gordon. In 2012, Spin gave Ranaldo and Moore the top spot on its “100 Greatest Guitarists” list as descendants of the “no wave” musical movement of late 1970s New York.

Steve Gunn takes a different approach to his guitar. In the tradition of acts like John Fahey and other American Primitivist guitarists, Gunn utilizes fingerpicking techniques to produce notes and sequences full of melodious resonance accompanied by his voice.

“Solo guitar music (is) overall pretty mellow,” Brian Koscho, marketing director of Stuart’s Opera House, said. “But it should be a mix of mellow and rockin’. All of the performers have played in louder groups in their careers.”

Parallel to his solo releases dating back to 2007, Gunn played guitar in Kurt Vile’s backing band “The Violators.” Last summer, he collaborated with the “Pretty Pimpin’” rocker on an EP for Three Lobed Recordings titled Parallelogram, which includes three original songs and three covers of songs by Randy Newman, John Prine and Nico.

Meg Baird will open with the first of the three sets. She has played at the Nelsonville Music Festival with the San Francisco psych-rock band Heron Oblivion but has never played the town as a solo performer. She also performs with the Philadelphia psych-folk Espers.

She will deliver her “classic singer style” Wednesday with her Martin 00-15 guitar. She described her performance as “kind of a shared quietness that isn’t forced” between her and the audience.

“(All three of us) are chasing a lot of voicings and playing a really layered style,” Baird said. “My playing is pretty related to what Steve is doing with classic fingerpicking, but we are a little idiosyncratic and individual.”

The three guitarists bear different guitar styles exemplifying the possibilities of guitar work. However, roving in a similar group of collaborators, Ranaldo, Gunn and Baird maintain a complimentary sound that will echo off the walls of Stuart’s Opera House on Wednesday.